Caterpillar Partners with Textron Specialized Vehicles for UTVs

Cushman Hauler 1200

Textron Specialized Vehicles, which makes utility vehicles like the Cushman Hauler 1200, is partnering with Caterpillar to manufacturer CAT branded UTVs.

Caterpillar, the world’s leading manufacturer of construction and mining equipment, diesel and natural gas engines, industrial gas turbines and diesel-electric locomotives, has entered into a manufacturing and supply agreement with Textron Specialized Vehicles to develop CAT branded utility vehicles.

The CAT utility vehicles will feature a steel cargo bed with a 1,000 lb. capacity and be able to tow up to 2,000 lbs. According to Cat product manager Steve Schoening, “Cat utility vehicles will offer exceptional performance and stability at full load, superior reliability, and a quiet, spacious operator environment”. There will also be ample headroom and legroom for tall operators.

Those specs are similar to the Cushman Hauler 1200 and Hauler 4×4 Diesel although the Haulers have slightly more cargo bed capacity by significantly less towing capacity. Caterpillar has 49 independent dealers in the US and another 123 worldwide. The CAT UTV will be available in 2018.

This is another example of utility vehicle manufacturers expanding their distribution through partnerships to reach additional market segments or geographic areas. Textron Speciality Vehicles has their Cushman product line that touches on the construction equipment market segment, but Caterpillar’s brand and dealer network provides access to the heart of heavy equipment markets. The partnership also helps increase production volume for Textron that can further reduce their manufacturing costs. For Caterpillar the partnership provides an easy add-on to their product line for a type of vehicle that many of their heavy equipment customers are likely already buying, but from other brands. In addition, they do not have to spend as much non-monetary resources developing and producing a type of vehicle that is not core to their mission or expertise. Learn more:  Constructionequipment.com

Marc Cesare, SmallVehicleResource.com

More STOV Self-Driving Tech

Polaris MRZR X autonomous vehicle

The self-driving MRZR X developed by Polaris, ARA and Neya Systems for the Army’s SMET program.

A recent post highlighted current self-driving tech in the STOV market and commented on the potential in the future. In the past week I came across a couple of additional examples of self-driving tech in the market.

The first is a collaboration between Polaris Industries, Applied Research Associates (ARA) and Neya Systems to provide a platform for the US Army’s Squad Multipurpose Equipment Transport (SMET) program. Polaris brings their MRZR vehicle platform, currently sold to US and allied military organizations around the world, to the collaboration, Neya Systems is providing advanced unmanned systems technology and ARA brings experience in bringing computer and other technical expertise to national security issues. The SMET program’s goal is to develop a ground robotic vehicle to carry a squad’s worth of life support and combat gear. An Army squad typically consists of nine soldiers. (Learn more:  Businesswire.com)

A self-driving shuttle from Auro which was recently acquired by Ridecell.

The second example is California based Ridecell that is developing self-driving, low-speed vehicles for use on private property such as colleges, theme parks, business parks, retirement communities, and basically any campus like setting that can set it’s own traffic rules. Ridecell recently acquired autonomous shuttle maker Auro Robotics. Ridecell will also be providing fleet-management software and services which they already provide for BMW’s and Volkswagen’s car sharing services.The battery-electric shuttle has a top speed of 25 mph and a 90-mile range. Auro currently builds three different configurations to suit various transportation needs and is using GEMs as their base vehicle platform. They provide 2, 6 or 12 seat shuttles depending on customer need. Learn more:  Greencarreports.com

Ridecell is targeting exactly the markets I mentioned in my previous post. The college campus market in particular is already a major market for GEM. However, local GEM dealers could find themselves in competition with Ridecell and indirectly with Polaris who manufactures GEM vehicles, if they end up selling directly to Ridecell. It may be useful for Ridecell, Polaris corporate and local GEM dealers to collaborate in marketing self-driving vehicles. Ridecell could significantly expand their distribution and service channel and enhance their marketing efforts, Polaris could sell more GEMs without alienating their dealer base while establishing the GEM brand in the self-driving space, and GEM dealers could provide a value-added, next generation product to their customers while adding a differentiating and potentially higher margin product to their vehicle lineup.

For GEM dealers this could also be an opportunity to grab a greater share of the gated community market. Traditionally this has been a harder sell for LSVs because of the price of LSVs in comparison to used, refurbished, new and customized golf cars. The Ridecell product however would more likely be marketed to the organization operating the community rather than individual owners, since it would be a shuttle service shared by the community. The economics would be different as well, as the shuttle service would likely need to start with a brand new vehicle. Over the long term, a self-driving shuttle service could very well significantly erode the individual vehicle market in gated communities.

Marc Cesare, Smallvehicleresource.com

Can-Am Enters Trail Segment with 2018 Maverick Trail Models

Can-Am side-by-side

New Can-Am side-by-side models for 2018 including trail specific models and application specific Defender  and Maverick X3 models.

Can-Am launched their entry into the trail riding segment with four 50″ wide Maverick Trail models for 2018. The new models are the Maverick Trail and Maverick Trail DPS, both of which have the option of a Rotax 800 or Rotax 1000 engine. They also added technical crawling-specific models, the 172hp Can-Am Maverick X3 X rc TURBO R and the 120hp Maverick X3 X rc TURBO.

New for the Defender line for 2018 are the mud ready Defender X mr HD10, the performance oriented Defender XT-P, and the Defender MAX LONE STAR HD10 targeting the rancher segment with a mixture of heavy-duty components and flair.

Can-Am’s 2018 model year is an extension of the company’s aggressive product development pace in the side-by-side market for the last several years. They have been updating their existing product lines while targeting market segments in which they have not had a presence. First was their introduction of the Defender line aimed more for work oriented applications, and particularly for farms and multi-acre home owners. Now they are attacking the trail segment that has largely been left to Polaris and Arctic Cat, now known as Textron Off Road. They are also continuing to differentiate within market segments with their existing product lines by adding application specific vehicles.

These are all trends that are occurring in the market in general as competition in the side-by-side market in both recreational and utility segments has revved up. For customers this has translated into better promotions and pricing, increasing vehicle functionality and performance and a better value proposition. In Can-Am’s case, their new product development strategy has led to increased revenue and market share from the success of their Defender line and annual improvements to the Maverick family.

In the last few years many manufacturers, both large and small, have revitalized product lines, added product lines and newly entered the market, particularly in the utility segment. The challenge is to remain committed to the market with the resources needed to regularly develop competitive vehicles and build out distribution channels. There is likely to be a shakeout in the market in the next few years as some companies will have difficulty remaining competitive product offerings in the face of aggressive product introductions by Can-Am and other manufacturers.

Marc Cesare, Smallvehicleresource.com

The following is the press release from Can-Am

Dallas, Texas, Sept. 20, 2017 – BRP (TSX: DOO) unveils four new 50”-wide Can-Am Maverick Trail side-by-side vehicles at its annual dealer meeting in Dallas, TX. People can now enjoy the Maverick experience while accessing many public trails and tucked-away destinations with ease. With their innovative design and extreme agility, Maverick Trail vehicles enhance the consumer experience and allow people to explore the wild with confidence.

The Maverick Trail vehicle is conceived to bring one of the best trail experiences to people with its bold Can-Am Maverick X3 heritage and its ingenious convenience features. Every feature is purpose-built to maximize consumer comfort, vehicle stability, and handling – a must for people who are looking for a full day of adventures.

“The Can-Am Maverick Trail lineup introduces our incredible X3 pedigree to trail exploration,” said Bernard Guy, Senior Vice President, Global Product Strategy at BRP. “People love riding trails because it’s an adventurous escape into nature to discover new destinations with friends, and these ingenious machines are built to maximize the user experience in every way.”

The fun doesn’t stop on the trail, though, as BRP also introduced two new technical crawling-specific models for 2018 – the 172hp Can-Am Maverick X3 X rc TURBO R and the 120hp Maverick X3 X rc TURBO. Rugged crawling is extremely popular (and growing), and BRP went to the rocks to gain real-world insight from owners before finalizing the design.
One critical takeaway for the best possible user experience was the need for a fully-lockable front differential. In response, the Can-Am team created a technology called SMART-Lok™*, which is an ingenious fully-lockable on-the-fly front differential with electronically-controlled automatic modes. That smart technology enhances the riding experience and amounts to traction in extreme conditions.

Maverick X3 X rc models are specifically designed for maximum maneuverability even at low speeds with a high ground clearance and large, specialized tires. They also come loaded with features for maximum protection including rock sliders, front and rear suspension protectors, and a front differential guard for enhanced defense against harsh terrain and rocks.

On the utility side of the lineup, BRP introduced three new specialty packages to its Can-Am Defender model family, each purpose-built for a specific, enhanced ride experience:

  • The Defender X mr HD10 is a mud-ready vehicle that’s built to tackle grimy conditions with ease. It also has a SMART-Lok front differential, and along with other tough and clever elements, is built from the ground up so people can conquer harsh environments.
  • The Defender XT-P brings performance to the workhorse-oriented Defender XT lineup, with upgraded shocks, multiple driving modes, and more. It’s an ideal balance between performance, comfort and convenience, and is packed with a sportier look.
  • The Defender MAX LONE STAR HD10 complements the swagger and grit of the Texas rancher and outdoorsman. It’s the perfect tool for day-to-day ranching tasks while making sure people stand out from the crowd. It features painted deep metallic black coloration, Lone Star trim, and heavy-duty components such as a steel front bumper and full hard roof.

For additional information and technical specs on these new models, as well as two all-new youth ATV models, visit www.CanAmOffRoad.com.

* Smart-Lok was developed in conjunction with TEAM Industries, a market leader in the drive train industry.

About BRP
BRP (TSX:DOO) is a global leader in the design, development, manufacturing, distribution and marketing of powersports vehicles and propulsion systems. Its portfolio includes Ski-Doo and Lynx snowmobiles, Sea-Doo watercraft, Can-Am off-road and Spyder vehicles, Evinrude and Rotax marine propulsion systems as well as Rotax engines for karts, motorcycles and recreational aircraft. BRP supports its line of products with a dedicated parts, accessories and clothing business. With annual sales of CA$4.2 billion from over 100 countries, the Company employs approximately 8,700 people worldwide.

University Reveals aCar: An Electric Utility Vehicle For Africa

aCar electric utility vehicle

A frontal view of the aCar on test in Ghana,

aCar electric utility vehicle

The aCar was developed by the  Technical University of Munich.

Technical University of Munich (TUM) scientists have introduced a prototype electric powered utility vehicle designed for use in rural Africa. Four years in development, the prototype is called aCar, as in “all-rounder”, and was developed specifically to meet the needs of sub-Saharan countries.

The aCar is a cross between a UTV and a small truck, and is off-road capable and can transport heavy loads with a total load capacity of 1 ton. The aCar has four-wheel drive and electric powered to minimize maintenance, provide plenty of torque and be environmentally friendly. The battery can also be used to power winch or as an energy source. The modular design for the rear of the vehicle provides versatility to carry cargo, passengers, a mobile physicians office, a water treatment solution or other functionality. Other key specifications and features include:

  • 20 kW battery capacity
  • 48-volt system
  • 80 km range
  • Top speed:  60 km/h
  • 7 hour recharging time from 220 volt household socket
  • Optional solar sheets
  • Price: under 10,000 euros
  • 3.7m x 1.5 m x 2.1 m
  • Seating capacity:  2
  • Simple production and low manufacturing costs

The vehicle was tested in Ghana for a month and was well received by locals. The aCar will first be produced in Europe to understand and optimize production, but the goal is to move production and eventually component manufacturing to Africa.

Learn more:  TUM.de

This project highlights some of the obstacles in creating a capable and affordable vehicle for customers in developing countries. Not only does such  vehicle have to be affordable to purchase but also to operate. One might think that a large UTV manufacturer could just export their lower priced models. However, the complexity of the design, the need for a reliable fuel supply, and the additional cost of shipping the vehicle all create obstacles.

In terms of design, complexity invites potential for more breakdowns and requires a robust supply chain for parts and more technical expertise for repairs. A simple but robust design alleviates these issues. A leading UTV manufacturer would likely have to develop an entirely different platform for this market.

The modular approach for the aCar is different from the accessories and options approach in the UTV market. Developing modules for specific applications provides some flexibility but, in comparison to the UTV market, limits the level of customization that can be achieved. On the other hand, developing the modules and the requisite supply chain, is likely more cost effective than developing and supplying a wide range of accessories and options in areas where a dealer network will be very limited. A next step in this project may be to look at how the modular design approach can best balance cost, supply and complexity issues with vehicle customization to increase productivity and value.

Marc cesare, Smallvehicleresource.com

STOV Self-driving Tech

Yamaha Viking VI autonomous driving

Yamaha Viking VI with autonomous driving technology.

Driverless technology and autonomous driving have been garnering plenty of attention and press lately. The vast majority of the focus has been on highway capable vehicles, but the small, task-oriented vehicle market (STOV) is active in this new area of innovation as well.

One recent example is Yamaha’s development of a fully autonomous Viking VI utility vehicle using their Autonomous System X1 technology. The screenshots from a video of the vehicle in action provides an idea of the technology at work.

Yamaha Viking VI

No driver but some additional screens.

Yamaha Viking VI

Some of the imagery tech the autonomous Viking VI uses.

Yamaha Viking VI

The autonomous Viking VI maneuvering around an obstacle on the trail.

The system combines GPS, LIDAR (light detection and ranging) and an IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit). Publicly available aerial imagery and digital elevation maps are used to plan the trip, and simulations from a terrain model are used to find the best local path. In addition, camera images are used to detect traversable ares in an off-road environment. The video of the Viking VI in autonomous action is impressive.

May Mobility self-driving GEM

GEM configured by MAy Mobility for self-driving.

Another example are two GEM vehicles being used by May Mobility to test self-driving technology in the city of Detroit. The testing will be conducted from Oct. 9 to 13 in conjunction with Bedrock, LLC, a real estate firm. The six seater GEMs are configured with May Mobility’s software and sensors and be used to transport Bedrock workers to and from various company locations. The vehicles will operate for three hours a day, travel only on roads with a speed limit of 35 mph or less, and have a driver on board to take control in emergency situations if necessary. Learn more:  Startribune.com

In our recently released STOV market study, SVR argues that self-driving technology could produce a significant boost to the STOV market in the coming years. The lower speed environments may provide a safer environment to initially implement self-driving technology. A number of self-driving test vehicles are being used as shuttles along readily defined loops with limited variation. Gated communities are another low speed environment with limited variability that could provide an easier entry point. The largest potential though resides in a large scale movement towards new urban mobility platforms. In congested urban areas the speed limitations of LSVs are less critical as is the lower vehicle range. On the plus side is the smaller size, zero emissions and lower noise of the vehicles. Self-driving technology has the potential to facilitate large scale deployment of low speed vehicles in urban environments.

 

BRP Announces FY18 Q2 Quarterly Results

Maverick X3 X RS Turbo R

The Maverick X3 X RS Turbo R helped drive strong sales in the second quarter.

BRP, manufacturer of Can-Am products, recently announced their financial results for the second quarter of their 2018 fiscal year which ended July 31, 2017. (All dollar amounts are in Canadian dollars.) Revenues increased 20% for the quarter to $1,027 million driven by strong demand in side-by-side and personal watercraft. Net income increased $168.9 million to $100.1 million.

It was a strong quarter for BRP and they continue to make solid gains in the UTV market and continue to take market share. The Defender line continues to meet with success on a quarter to quarter basis. The company has built out their dealer network and are looking to improve dealer performance. Look for them to introduce additional models on a regular basis.

The following are additional highlights from the earnings call and presentation that relate to the utility vehicle market.

  • Company introduced the 172hp Can-Am Maverick X3 Turbo R model during the quarter
  • North American retail sales for side-by-sides increased 50% for the quarter in an industry that grew low teens %.
  • North American ATV retail sales grew high teen % in an industry that grew low single digit %.
  • For side-by-side model year ending June 30, Can-Am retail sales grew mid-thirties % in an industry up mid-single digit %.
  • The X3 and the Defender line are particularly strong performers.
  • Side-by-side sales are driving parts, accessories and clothing revenue hire
  • Management is seeing results from improving dealer performance and is concentrating on that area rather than looking to add new dealers. Nearly 300 dealers were added in the last four years.
  • Side-by-side sales outside of North America are very strong as well.
  • Management reports that promotional activity in the ATV and side-by-side market is high with many new models being introduced and OEMs looking to reduce inventory.

Polaris Issues Recall of 1,600 General UTVs

2017 Polaris General Base

The 2017 Polaris General Base model in red is part of the recall.

2017 Polaris General Hunter

The Hunter version is recalled as well.

Polaris Industries recently announced the recall of approximately 1,600 2017 General utility vehicles due to inconsistent tire pressure information which could result in improperly-inflated tires, posing a crash hazard. The affected models are the Base model in red and the Hunter model in camo. No injuries have been reported related to this recall. Owners should immediately stop using the recalled vehicles and contact Polaris for a new tire pressure label and addendum to the owner’s manual. Polaris can be contacted at 800-765-2747 or at www.polaris.com for more information.

This is a relatively small recall compared to many of the industry recalls. In addition, the cost to Polaris for addressing the issue would appear to be minor. SVR tracks industry recalls and has compiled an ongoing list.

The complete recall information from the Consumer Safety Product Commission follows.

Recall Details

Description:  This recall involves all model year 2017 Polaris GENERAL Base and GENERAL Hunter two-seat, side-by-side recreational off-highway vehicles (ROVs). The GENERAL Base was sold in red and the GENERAL Hunter was sold in camo. “Polaris” is printed on the front grill, “GENERAL” is printed on the rear panel and “1000” is printed on the front panel. The VIN is printed on the left rear vehicle frame below the cargo box.
Remedy:  Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled vehicles and contact Polaris for a new tire pressure label and addendum to the owner’s manual. All known purchasers are being contacted directly by the firm.
Incidents/Injuries:  None reported
Sold At:  Polaris dealers nationwide from June 2016 through July 2017 for between $16,300 and $19,000.
Manufacturer(s):  Polaris Industries Inc., of Medina, Minn.
Importer(s):  Polaris Industries Inc., of Medina, Minn.
Manufactured In:  U.S. and Mexico
Units:  About 1,600
Marc Cesare, Smallvehicleresource.com

Yamaha Introduces 2018 Wolverine X4 UTV

2018 Yamaha Wolverine X4

The new 2018 Yamaha Wolverine X4, a 4-passenger UTV designed to be more compact and nimble for recreational use.

Yamaha recently announced their new 4-passenger 2018 Wolverine X4 side-by-side. The Wolverine X4 features a new 847cc, twin-cylinder engine and stowaway full-size rear seats for flexible cargo space. To improve efficiency, the engine features a dry-sump design for a more compact layout, and an offset cylinder block to reduce friction loss, while rubber engine-mounts and a geared counterbalancer are designed to greatly reduce vibration at idle and throughout the RPM range, as well as reduce noise. The X4 also includes the new Yamaha Chip Controlled-Throttle (YCC-T®), a drive-by-wire system providing precise throttle control, and a key controlled speed system for restricting the vehicle’s top speed to 25 mph. The dimensions (59.8″ wide and 82.7″ wheelbase) of the new Wolverine X4 are purposely on the compact end of the scale to provide a more nimble vehicle for more technical trail riding. Other key features and specs include:

  • Ultramatic V-belt transmission with all-wheel engine braking
  • Yamaha On-Command 3-way locking differential; 2WD, 4WD, full diff-lock 4WD
  • 8.7″/8.9″ of front/rear suspension travel
  • 10.7″ of ground clearance
  • Rear self-leveling shocks
  • 26″ Maxxis tires
  • Electronic power steering
  • Hydraulic disc brakes
  • 600 lb. cargo bed capacity
  • 2,000 lb. towing capacity
  • Full underbody skid plates
  • Fully enclosed doors
  • Wide fenders
  • LED headlights and taillights
  • Two 12V DC outlets
  • Four pre-wired accessory switches
  • MSRP $15,999 in Graphite

Model variations include the Wolverine X4 in:

  • Yamaha Blue with overfenders and cast aluminum wheels (MSRP $16,499)
  • Realtree Xtra camo with overfenders and cast aluminum wheels (MSRP $16,899)
  • Matte Silver and Matte Carbon Special Edition (SE) models with overfenders, painted bodywork, color-matched interior and shock springs, and cast aluminum wheels (MSRP $17,249)

According to Yamaha managers they are trying to deliver a 4-seat UTV with some of the handling and size characteristics of a two seater and a high degree of versatility. They believe this segment of the market is currently underserved.

Learn more:  Yamahamotorsports.com

Comment:  The fact that the Wolverine X4 has been designed from the ground up and includes an entirely new engine shows the level of commitment Yamaha has made to the UTV space. They have rolled out new Wolverine and Viking models for 2018 after making a big push in the last two model years in the sport end of the market with the YXZ. The UTV market has become highly competitive and manufacturers will need to be introducing innovative new models on a regular basis to drive sales.

Marc Cesare, Smallvehicleresource.com

New SVR Market Study Predicts Solid Growth For STOVs

In a new market study on the small task-oriented vehicle (STOV) market in the US and Canada, Small Vehicle Resource (SVR), LLC predicts growth over the 2017-2021 period. The market research reveals four trends coming together that will result in market gains of mid to high single digits in the forecast period and an industry value in the range of $15.8 billion at retail including parts and accessories.

  • Growing appreciation in a highly diverse market for the effectiveness of STOVs specifically designed to meet individual segment needs;
  • Increasing competition that will drive new product development as manufacturers seek to strengthen current market strongholds and stake out additional market segments with new and/or expanded product lines;
  • Continuing focus on accessories and attachments to enhance the versatility and value of STOVs, boost revenues and supplant other vehicle types such as pick-ups and tractors for work and full-size vehicles for transportation;
  • Golf manufacturers emphasizing non-fleet markets over the continuing slow/negative growth golf car fleet market.

Steve Metzger, SVR Managing Director, states that, “While the fleet market remains in a downsizing mode, it is a marginal decline. It will remain a significant component of the golf car-type vehicle market. On the other hand, SVR forecasts continued sizable gains in the non-fleet market, including light utility and transporter vehicles and personal transportation vehicles.” Metzger also notes, “SVR anticipates that important new opportunities lie ahead, including self-driving technology applications, as well as potential for a much broader market on a global basis.”

Marc Cesare, SVR Managing Director adds, “The off-road utility vehicle market continues to be a competitive vortex for golf car manufacturers seeking new markets, the powersports industry, and traditional manufacturers of work related utility vehicles. While market growth will be slower than the recent high growth years, it remains solid,” Cesare notes, “ and competition will drive product innovation in both base vehicles as well as options and attachments that improve vehicle performance and versatility.

Approximately a third of the market value is from electric powered STOVs, primarily in the form of golf cars or golf car derived utility vehicles and personal transportation vehicles (PTVs). PTVs are golf cars modified for gated community or low speed public road use and include low speed vehicles (LSVs). Key trends and projections for the market include:

  • In total, demand for electric powered STOVs will increase to over 300,000 vehicles in 2021.
  • The demand for non-fleet golf car type vehicles will more than offset the slight decline in the fleet golf car market, moving from under 50% of the total demand to over 50%.
  • Light utility vehicles produced by golf car and other manufacturers are expected to grow approximately 10% annually to 2021.
  • PTVs will continue to grow low single digits during the trend period and electric powered PTVs will slowly increase to represent nearly 75% of the market by 2021. LSVs will account for about one-fifth of the PTVmarket.

Metzger, states that, “The potential for even greater electric powered STOV growth is there. In the PTV market the combination of market forces and emerging technologies could greatly increase the applicability of PTVs. Increasing urbanization is expected to create congestion and pollution issues, and the search for new transportation solutions. The advent of self-driving vehicle technology along with improved battery technology creates the potential for mobility platforms that can in part be based on small PTVs.” He further notes, “Gated communities with their more controlled environments could prove to be excellent testing grounds and the concepts could then migrate to urban environments that are well suited to low speed vehicle operations.”

The new study, the eighth in the series of studies produced by SVR since 2000, covers utility, off-road, and personal transportation vehicles, and fleet golf cars.

The study is entitled, 2017 Market Report on the Small, Task-Oriented Vehicle Industry: Transition and Growth –Trends from 2012; Forecasts to 2021. 

For additional, detailed information on study content a brochure is available with a table of contents ( Small Task-Oriented Vehicle Study – Analysis & Forecast (PDF)) or contact:

Steve Metzger,  smetzger@smallvehicleresource.com

(914) 293-7577

Textron Off Road Announces 2018 Models

Textron Off Road Logo

Textron Off Road announced their 2018 UTV lineup, the first since Textron Off Road replaced the Arctic Cat name for UTVs and ATVs. The 2018 UTV lineup includes 15 different models including Wildcat, Stampede, Recoil and Prowler nameplates. While Textron Off Road kept many of the Wildcat offerings they have ditched the HDX and most of the Prowler offerings which had previously been sold under the Arctic Cat name. They also dropped their non-EPS base model for their Stampede lineup and changed the names of the other Stampede models.

  • Stampede EPS is now Stampede
  • Stampede EPS+ is now Stampede X
  • Stampede XTR EPS is now Stampede 4
  • Stampede XTR EPS+ is now Stampede 4X

Here is a summary of the 2018 lineup:

  • Recreational UTVs:  Wildcat X, Wildcat X LTD, Wildcat Trail, Wildcat Trail XT, Wildcat Trail LTD, Wildcat Sport XT, Wildcat Sport LTD, Wildcat 4X LTD
  • Crossover UTVs:  Stampede X, Stampede 4X, Stampede, Stampede 4
  • Electric UTVs:  Recoil, Recoil iS
  • Work/Entry Level UTV:  Prowler 500

The lineup is quite broad covering a range of segments from high performance to sport recreational riding, trail riding, 4-passenger and crew, electric powered, work, crossover and even entry level general utility with the Prowler 500. The following are key specs for some of the 2018 models:

Textron Off Road Prowler 500

The 2018 Prowler 500 from Textron Off Road.

Prowler 500

  • 443cc liquid-cooled 4-stroke, twin cylinder single overhead cam engine with EFI
  • On-Demand 4WD and Duramatic CVT
  • Double A-arm front and rear suspension with 7.5″ of travel
  • 10″ of ground clearance
  • 25″ Maxxis tires on steel wheels
  • 500 lb. dump bed capacity
  • 1,500 lb. towing capacity
  • Halogen low/high headlights and taillights
  • Door nets and 3-point seatbelts
  • 2-passenger
  • MSRP $8,499
Textron Off Road Wildcat X LTD

The 2018 Wildcat X LTD now under the Textron Off Road brand.

Wildcat X LTD

  • 951cc liquid-cooled 4-stroke, V-twin cylinder single overhead cam engine with EFI’
  • Electric 2/4WD with 4WD lock
  • Rapid response clutches
  • EPS
  • Double A-arm front suspension and 5-link rear suspension with Elka Stage 5 shocks with dual speed compression adjustment and rebound adjustment
  • 17″/18″ of front/rear suspension travel
  • 13″ of ground clearance
  • 27″ ITP Blackwater Evolution tires and aluminum ITP beadlock wheels
  • 300 lb. cargo box capacity
  • Dual LED headlights, brake lights and taillights
  • Half doors
  • 3-point seat belts and seat belt rev limiter
  • MSRP $18,499
Textron Off Road Stampede X

The 2018 Textron Off Road Stampede X previously known as Stampede EPS+.

Stampede X

  • 80 hp, 846cc liquid-cooled 4-stroke, twin cylinder single overhead cam engine with EFI
  • On-Demand AWD with automatic locking front differential and selectable locking rear differential
  • EPS
  • Double A-arm suspension front and rear with Performance shocks
  • 9.5″/10.5″ of front/rear suspension travel
  • 11.25″ of ground clearance
  • 27″ Maxxis Bighorn 2.0 tires and aluminum alloy wheels
  • 600 lb. dump bed capacity
  • 2,000 lb. towing capacity
  • Standard doors
  • Front steel brush guard
  • LCD display
  • USB outlet
  • Low/high beam headlights
  • Extended cab storage space
  • 3-point seat belts and seat belt rev limiter
  • 2-passenger
  • MSRP $14,799

While the Textron Off Road brand has absorbed the Arctic Cat brand, production for the Stampede models is being integrated into existing Arctic Cat production facilities. The Stampede model production is moving to the Thief Falls River, MN facility to join the Wildcat and Prowler production. Stampede engine production will move from Germany to St. Cloud, MN, which produced engines for Arctic Cat UTVs, ATVs and snowmobiles.

Current owners of Arctic Cat side-by-sides and ATVs can continue to visit their Arctic Cat dealer for vehicle service, parts and accessories.

Learn more:  Textronoffroad.com